Ringo's 10 greatest beats

7th Feb 2014 | 11:00

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
All I've Got To Do
1963

THE BEATLES IN THE USA: Following Lennon's beautiful vocals and McCartney's bass chords, Ringo's insistent rhythms and effective use of his bass drum punctuate and support the song fantastically.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Long Tall Sally
1964

Like all the band's early, energetic cover versions, Ringo and the other Fab Three give the Little Richard classic pace and raw rock energy.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Ticket To Ride
1965

From Help!, this track is memorable for Ringo's perfectly placed tom in the flamed main verse groove and rapid fill to bring the song's chorus to a climax.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Rain
1966

In drumming terms, Ringo was going through something of a purple patch, with this track one of three recorded on the Revolver sessions to make this list. His machinegun fills punctuate the track and again become a kind of signature. The track was the B-side to Paperback Writer.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Tomorrow Never Knows
1966

Ringo's relentlessly funky beat – which was later sampled by The Chemical Brothers – made The Beatles' mystical, Indian-styled 'Tomorrow Never Knows' truly inspiring.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
She Said She Said
1966

'She Said She Said', from Revolver, is a great example of Ringo's inventiveness and great touch; his flurrying fill becomes the tune's motif.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Day Tripper
1966

The AA side with 'We Can Work It Out' is given a solid four-to-the-floor chorus and syncopated verse with some nice little ghosted snare notes and perfectly judged fills.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Get Back
1969

Ringo's galloping snare and shuffling fills, punctuated with effective cymbal crashes drive this late Beatles track, which grew from a studio jam, with real finesse.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
Come Together
1969

The opening track of Abbey Road is, by the common consensus, one of Ringo's very finest moments. It features a recurring drum motif that acts as the song's main hook, based around 16th-note triplets around the hi-hat and toms.

Ringo's 10 greatest beats
The End
1969

Closing out Abbey Road is the rarest of things – a Ringo solo, recorded across two tracks in 'true stereo' (drums were normally mixed in mono then hard-panned right in the mix). Just argue with this, Ringo nay-sayers.

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