Terrors Hawked: £60,000 of Orange amplifiers taken in heist

18th Aug 2008 | 14:01

Orange Amps has issued the following statement:

Orange Amps has issued the following statement:

One of the world’s most famous British amplifier brands, Orange Amps, has just announced a major theft of a container load of amplifiers from its Borehamwood premises. Used by some of the biggest stars such as Madonna, Led Zeppelin Prince and Kaiser Chiefs, the robbers targeted this prestigious brand to carry out a daring raid on Saturday 16th August.



The one hundred forty one Orange Tiny Terror Combo guitar amps (pictured above), which have a combined value of over £60,000, were part of the first shipment of the much anticipated amps into the UK. The product was launched at the Frankfurt music exhibition earlier this year, on the back of the award winning acclaimed Tiny Terror amp which has sold over 30,000 units and proven to be one of the most in-demand amps in the world.

The combination amp and speaker has a value of £439 each and was stolen from a temperature controlled, sealed forty foot container. The robbers couldn’t break the locks so they attempted to use an acetylene welder and then angle grinders to cut through the quarter inch locking steel plates.

As this was part of the first delivery into the UK, only 121 units had been shipped into music shops, so this is still a highly sought after amp with very limited availability. Orange recently won the Queens Award for Enterprise - International Trade.

The Police have launched a major investigation and informed all relevant port and home authorities. Orange Amplifiers are putting up a reward of £5000 for information that will lead to a successful conviction and recovery of these amplifiers. If you have any information please contact the local Police force on 0845-3300222, quoting Crime Number J1/08/3588. The company have the serial numbers of all the products stolen which is available on it’s website at www.orangeamps.com
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